Wild brown trout from Arthurs Lake

Bushfires in Tasmania’s Highlands are over

Dry fly fishing Tasmania’s highlands – Tassie is still open for business as usual.
 
Arthurs Lake wild brown trout taking mayfly spinner. Lake Leake rainbow trout polaroided sipping beetles in bright sunshine. There are no issues in accessing great trout fishing following the recent bushfires in Tasmania.
Even during a bushfire, we have safe places to take you fishing.
Wild brown trout from Arthurs Lake

Wild brown trout from Arthurs Lake

Tasmania delivers unique fishing experiences every day.

Whether it’s mayflies hatching on overcast days or polaroiding on blue sky days, Tasmania’s fishing conditions deliver up a huge variety, and every day will be different.

Peter with wild brown trout from PenstockPeter polaroided this brown on Penstock Lagoon. It was happy to come straight up without hesitation to take an F fly (a mayfly CDC emerger without a hackle).

Peter with wild brown trout from ArthursA few spinner along the shorelines of Arthurs Lake and glassy conditions means a very sparse fly is important. Just cover the rise and let them find it, no need for much twitching of the fly at all.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Wild hail storm

Fishing: The best way to finish and start the year!

Tim's New Year's Eve wild Tasmanian Trout

Tim’s New Year’s Eve wild Tasmanian Trout

Tim's New Years Day wild Tasmanian trout

Tim’s New Years Day wild Tasmanian trout

Wild hail storm

Wild hail storm

To set the tone for the 12 months ahead, we highly recommend ending one year fly fishing and starting the next the same way!

New Year’s Eve.
Tim was really chuffed with this fish, although it wasn’t the bigger one that he originally spotted.

This particular fish was a one-cast opportunity. Tim’s casting skill and control of a nymph fast approaching the front side of a massive boulder led to an immediate response and a few minutes of high excitement to control this brownie in very fast water.

New Year’s Day
Started with a bit of cloud cover rolling in and virtually nobody on the water. It’s summertime, the trout are jumping and the spinners are high. Arthurs Lake.

It was a good morning and early afternoon over the shallows with a few fish moving to both the emerger and the spinner in the calm before the storm.

Later into the afternoon, we could see the heavy clouds and lightening start to roll towards Jonah Bay and of the few boats that had ventured out, most quickly headed back to the ramp. We sheltered from the heavy rain and hail under the trees on an island.

It was a memorable experience watching this hard and fierce freak storm, which lasted over half an hour, some hail the size of marbles, bouncing off the rocks and churning up the surface of the water. During the peak of the storm, we could not see very far at all past the boat from where we were sheltered. The temperature plummeted around 10 degrees.